Seeking to end hate crimes loophole: city edition

PCHR Executive Director Rue Landau testified in City Council before its public safety committee Tuesday on behalf of a new bill introduced to close the gaping loophole left when the state Supreme Court stripped hate crimes protections for LGBT and disabled people from the state code.

Bill No. 140720, introduced by City Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown and Councilman Jim Kenney would expand the city’s laws to include hate crimes penalties. Atop of whatever sentence the initial crime calls for, 90 more days and up to $2,000 would be added if it is determined to be a hate crime.

While the violent Center City gay bashing on Sept. 11 spurred a lot of attention for LGBT rights, the legislation also has an eye on people with disabilities, who also find themselves victims of hate crimes too often, statistics and advocates report.

Charles Horton Jr., executive director of the Mayor’s Commission on People with Disabilities, and Thomas Earle, president and CEO of Liberty Resources Inc.were among those testifying in support of the bill. Earle also serves as chair of PCHR.

There remain some questions on the legal construction of the bill in getting to the outcome desired by lawmakers, as raised by Capt. Francis Healy of the Philadelphia Police Department. Still, Healy, like Landau, spoke of the need to establish meaningful law to address hateful perpetrators.

Capt. Francis Healy (l.) and PCHR Executive Director Rue Landau (r.) testify at a committee meeting Tuesday on a proposed hate crimes bill offered by City Council.

Capt. Francis Healy (l.) and PCHR Executive Director Rue Landau (r.) testify at a committee meeting Tuesday on a proposed hate crimes bill offered by City Council.

“This would not be the first time Philadelphia is taking a leadership role to address issues of inequality,” Landau said. “But with any hope, what is proposed here soon will be mirrored and enacted on the state level. Still, I am convinced that regardless of the outcomes in Harrisburg,

“Philadelphia must continue its historic role of building and assuring tolerance for each and every resident and visitor here – and detail consequences for those who violate our shared values.”

It was an emotional day for Landau, as she spoke amid occasional tears. Gloria Casarez, the city’s LGBT affairs director, had planned on attending, if not testifying at this hearing; cancer robbed her of that chance last Sunday.

Read the full PCHR testimony here.

The committee unanimously approved the bill, which will go to the full City Council as early as next week.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s